Volume 24, Issue 7 is now available online

This issue features eight fascinating articles covering diverse topics addressing homelessness, caste names, and water provisioning to name a few. We also have articles spanning the globe from Scotland to Vietnam and more. Happy reading!

A continuing agenda for gender: the role of the IGU Commission on gender and geography
Shirlena Huang, Janice Monk, Joos Droogleever Fortuijn, Maria Dolors Garcia-Ramon & Janet Henshall Momsen

Researching boxing bodies in Scotland: Using apprenticeship to study the embodied construction of gender in hyper masculine space
Hanna Carlsson

Citation matters: mobilizing the politics of citation toward a practice of ‘conscientious engagement’
Carrie Mott & Daniel Cockayne

Occupational genders and gendered occupations: the case of water provisioning in Maputo, Mozambique
Cecilia Alda-Vidal , Maria Rusca , Margreet Zwarteveen , Klaas Schwartz & Nicky Pouw

Homelessness, nature, and health: toward a feminist political ecology of masculinities
Jeff Rose & Corey Johnson

What is in a name? How caste names affect the production of situated knowledge
Kamna Patel

Cocoons as a space of their own: a case of Emirati women learners
Gergana Alzeer

A zone of exception: gendered violences of family ‘Happiness’ in Vietnam
Helle Rydstrøm

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Annual Award for New and Emerging Scholars

Application closing date: 26 January 2018

The editorial team of Gender, Place and Culture is pleased to announce an annual award valued at a maximum of US$1,500 for new and emerging scholars. The award is targeted at emerging researchers in feminist geographies who are trying to establish research careers and create research momentum. The purpose is to support the research programme of promising feminist geographers and to give an impetus to their careers. The applicant should be involved in independent research and not be merely part of a larger group’s research project. Priority for this award will be given to current graduate students or faculty members within three years of receiving their PhD who are situated in partially or poorly funded positions, who work in departments where little or no money is available for conference participation and who have no recourse to grants from funding agencies such as the Economic and Social Research Council in the UK and the National Science Foundation in the USA or equivalent (if you currently hold one of these grants or have just completed one you will not be considered eligible for this award).

This award is intended to be used for attendance at an international conference of your choice, at which you will present a paper on a topic relating to feminist geography. The successful applicant is expected to use the award within one year of its receipt.

Applicants are asked to submit the following:

  • an abstract of the conference paper (250-300 words) and conference information including, if possible, confirmation of acceptance of your paper;
  • an academic CV;
  • a paragraph outlining how your research contributes to feminist geography;
  • a proposed budget (for accommodation, travel, conference fees, per diem, etc.);
  • and a cover letter including your contact details (mailing address, email, and telephone number).

Please send your applications to the Managing Editor, Pamela Moss (pamelam@uvic.ca), by 26 January 2018. A decision on the award will be made within 4 to 6 weeks of this deadline. Within one month of attending the conference the successful applicant is expected to submit receipts as well as a one page report.

Gender, Place and Culture is Seeking One New Editor

Gender, Place and Culture, published by Routledge, is a well-established geography journal with an international circulation in its field. The current Managing Editor is Pamela Moss (Canada) and Editors are Katherine Brickell (UK), Kanchana Ruwanpura (UK) and Margaret Walton-Roberts (Canada). In 2017 the journal began publishing 12 issues per year. It accepts manuscript submissions via ScholarOne (previously known as Manuscript Central). The journal Impact Factor of 1.605 and its rankings in 2016 SSCI Journal Citation Reports are 34/79 (Geography) and 7/41 (Women’s Studies). The 2016 5-year Impact Factor is now 1.856. Please visit www.tandfonline.com/cgpc for additional information about the Journal.

We are looking for ONE new editor to join the editorial team to extend the success and growth of the journal. The editor would start by ‘shadowing’ a current Editor in January of 2018 to learn the system, and sometime in the second quarter of 2018 would be expected to start editing papers independently and build up a full workload.

The tasks to be undertaken will include but are not be limited to:

  • Day to day manuscript management including: soliciting, receiving and processing manuscripts;
  • responsibility for identifying strategies to enhance the quality and reputation of the journal;
  • working with the Managing Editor and the Editorial Board to develop the editorial strategy and direction of the Journal and to act as ambassador for the journal;
  • commissioning and promoting special sections.

There is some flexibility in both timeline and the length of the term served. Most Editors serve a three to five year term.

Candidates should have a broad knowledge of the field of feminist geography and of women’s and gender studies more generally; be open to a wide range of studies submitted by scholars from all world regions; have access to e-mail and internet on an ongoing basis; be tech-knowledgeable and tech-friendly; be prepared to manage a consistent workload over the term served; and have excellent editing skills. Our preference is for the new Editor to already have editorial experience as they will be expected to take on a number of papers fairly soon after joining the journal. Candidates will ideally be established in their personal academic career development. In common with the journal’s mission on diversity and representation we would strongly encourage applications from outside of the UK and North America.

Applications should consist of a letter detailing the candidate’s editorial experience, and their vision and ambitions for the journal, plus a CV. Nominations of suitable persons are also being solicited.

Closing date for applications is 24 November 2017. Further information about the activities and responsibilities of the editors can be obtained from Pamela Moss. Nominations and applications should be sent directly to Pamela Moss (pamelam@uvic.ca).

Volume 24, Issue 6 now available

This issue features 9 fascinating articles and 3 book reviews, which are all listed below with direct links. In case you missed the announcement, Gender, Place and Culture will be publishing doctoral dissertation précis in each issue. Submissions will be considered on a competitive basis. Each précis will undergo a vetting process by an Editor. Successful submissions will join the queue for publication. The Editors invite authors to submit précis of their dissertations through ScholarOne. Dissertations defended in 2016 and 2017 are now being accepted. More information can be found here.

ARTICLES

Teresa Lloro-Bidart

Kathryn Gillespie & Victoria Lawson

New rapid response articles available now: Emergent and Divergent Spaces in the Women’s March: The Challenges of Intersectionality and Inclusion

Gender, Place & Culture, Volume 24, Issue 5, is now available online on Taylor & Francis Online <http://www.tandfonline.com>. This important issue is dedicated to articles concerned with the Women’s March, one of the largest coordinated protests in US and world history. Entitled ‘Emergent and Divergent Spaces in the Women’s March: The Challenges of Intersectionality and Inclusion’, the collection addresses some of the key issues arising through collective expressions of protest.

You may also like to read our linked blog post ‘Reflecting on the Women’s March on Washington’ by Frances Kunreuther here

Introduction

Emergent and divergent spaces in the Women’s March: the challenges of intersectionality and inclusion

Pamela Moss & Avril Maddrell

Pages: 613-620 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2017.1351509
Rapid Response articles

On being groped and staying quiet. Or, what kind of place an airplane can be
Naomi Adiv
Pages: 621-627 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2017.1342075

Intersectional feminism beyond U.S. flag hijab and pussy hats in Trump’s America
Banu Gökarıksel & Sara Smith

Pages: 628-644 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2017.1343284

‘It definitely felt very white’: race, gender, and the performative politics of assembly at the Women’s March in Victoria, British Columbia
CindyAnn Rose-Redwood & Reuben Rose-Redwood
Pages: 645-654 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2017.1335290

Token girl: reflections of an emerging feminist’s journey through music
Amanda Hooykaas
Pages: 655-660 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2017.1328663

Generative spaces: intimacy, activism and teaching feminist geographies
Shannon Burke, Alexandra Carr, Helena Casson, Kate Coddington, Rachel Colls, Alice Jollans, Sarah Jordan, Katie Smith, Natasha Taylor & Heather Urquhart
Pages: 661-673 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2017.1335293

Latent alliances: the Women’s March and agrarian feminism as opportunities of and for political ecology
Garrett Graddy-Lovelace
Pages: 674-695 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2017.1342604

KNIT + RESIST: placing the Pussyhat Project in the context of craft activism
Shannon Black
Pages: 696-710 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2017.1335292

(Re)producing feminine bodies: emergent spaces through contestation in the Women’s March on Washington

Sydney Boothroyd, Rachelle Bowen, Alicia Cattermole, Kenda Chang-Swanson, Hanna Daltrop, Sasha Dwyer, Anna Gunn, Brydon Kramer, Delaney M. McCartan, Jasmine Nagra, Shereen Samimi & Qwisun Yoon-Potkins
Pages: 711-721 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2017.1339673

Resist, persist, desist: building solidarity from Grandma Ella through baby Angela to the Women’s March
Bisola Falola & Chelsi West Ohueri
Pages: 722-740 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2017.1335291

Coming out of darkness and into activism
Petra Doan
Pages: 741-746 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2017.1328664

Book Reviews
Constructive feminism: women’s spaces and women’s rights in the American city
Jenny Lendrum
Pages: 747-748 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2016.1275105

An imperialist love story: desert romances in the war on terror
Andrea Miller

Pages: 748-750 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2016.1275106

This year’s model: fashion, media, and the making of glamour
Pilar Ortiz
Pages: 750-751 | DOI: 10.1080/0966369X.2016.1275109

A Box Filled with Treasures by Maureen Wilson

female wall

This post is written by Maureen Wilson, Hamilton, Ontario

I have a box filled with treasures.

No, they’re not diamonds, gold or even Apple shares. These treasures are homemade cards and pieces of art work made by each of my three children. Some of them are touching: “I love daddy. Daddy loves pizza and pie. But he loves me more” (Nailed it). Some are funny: “For 7 years of my life, you were a good mom.” That one was written by my son when he was seven. I can’t wait to see what he writes when he’s 14 and 21. Or maybe I can.

No hallmark card comes close to offering me a glimpse into the heart, humour and personality of each of my children at that moment in their lives. My son will never be seven again, but I have a piece, however small, of what he was like when he was seven. Just thinking about it makes me weepy.

Which brings me to the Women’s March on Washington. I suppose it’s because I love the written word so much that I was drawn to the signs. Thousands upon thousands upon thousands of signs, almost all of which were homemade. The same mothers who have made countless trips to the craft store or the dollar store on behalf of their kids and pending school projects were making the same trip for themselves. Bristol board. Markers. Some required glue and yarn. Others needed cotton batten. There was paint of every colour.

I’ve been to a few demonstrations over the last number of decades but I’m the furthest thing from radical. I aspired to be Mary Tyler Moore’s “Mary Richards” when I was younger, not Gloria Steinem. I am a feminist and have thought of myself as a feminist most of my life. To be sure, I am a white now middle class feminist. I am growing increasingly aware of my privilege and I know that I must listen and learn from the experiences of women unlike myself, including women of colour and Indigenous women. Some of the signs helped in that regard and have got me started on my journey.

The homemade signs offered a glimpse into the heart, humour and personality of each woman. They owned their signs. It was important to them and they carried the signs with pride and tremendous emotion. And, unlike other demonstrations I have been to, solidarity and strength was not measured in the uniformity of each sign. It was found in the differences. And, isn’t that a lesson in democracy, inclusiveness and civility, especially after witnessing the intentional chaos, panic and fear of the Executive Order from the President of the United States seeking to ban refugees (Muslims) from entering the United States – a case study in how demagogues and their handlers fan the flames of division, create scapegoats and use diversionary tactics to reorder society to prop up their own positions of power and privilege.

But of all the signs I bore witness to last Saturday one in particular affected me most. We came upon a long line of women, and a few men, with linked hands dressed in jumpsuits depicting a brick wall. In the place of some bricks were the words:

  • Dog
  • Bimbo
  • Must be a pretty picture. YOU DROPPING TO YOUR KNEES.
  • As long as you’ve got a young and beautiful PIECE OF ASS.
  • A person who is FLAT CHESTED is very hard to be a 10.
  • Disgusting Animal
  • There was blood coming out of her eyes. Blood coming out of her wherever
  • Slob
  • I’ve said if Ivanka weren’t my daughter, perhaps I’d be dating her

Of course, these are the words of Donald Trump. We had all heard these words over the past year. But to see them in bold print and attached to the bodies of women was very powerful. Imagine the size of the crowd, as you’ve seen from the television reports, and then imagine absolute silence. Women knelt before this wall and cried. I cried. The women forming the wall cried and strangers hugged strangers to console, to grieve, to give strength and support. I don’t think I’ll ever forget it as long as I live.

The printed word matters. Today, more than ever. Truth matters. Alternative truth is another word for fiction. Sources that seek to uncover and offer the truth matter like the free press and libraries. I will double down on my support for both and I hope to unite with people who feel the same. And, I will refill my supply of Bristol board and markers and always have a comfortable pair of shoes at hand. I am ready to march. Again.

Reflecting on the Women’s March on Washington

 

Written by Frances Kunreuther, Reblogged from the Building Movement Project

The day after Trump’s inauguration, I was one of the 500,000 or 1.2 million who marched in Washington, D.C.  I was glad to be there, even with the flaws. There was a feeling of optimism reflected in the pussy hats, homemade signs, different issues that were represented, throngs of people, and general good will. That feeling is quickly fading as our new President’s actions wreak havoc on the environment, Muslims, people in need of health care, refugees, women who are sexually active, people of color, immigrants, workers, those without resources, and so much more.

Being at a march that was dominated by white women, I kept thinking about the ‘other white women’ – the majority who voted for Trump. They were not wearing pussy hats or holding signs that read “Free Melania” or shouting, “Our Bodies, Our Choice.” Trump’s denigration of women, or anyone else, didn’t seem to matter to them, or to matter enough to keep them from casting their vote for a self-avowed sexual predator, and the question is why not?

I began to wonder if white women are just used to men like Trump. Maybe he is not that different from the other men in their lives: husbands, fathers, partners, sons, co-workers, neighbors, friends. White men who feel it is fine to talk about, or grab, someone’s pussy and claim it’s a compliment; who believe they have power that should not be challenge.

Back in the day, I worked in what we called the battered women’s movement. We saw intimate partner violence as an issue of power. We knew it was systemic, that institutions – school, communities, laws, policies, families, and in places of worship – kept gender-based power differences in place. We heard the justifications for the violence, and we listened to the reasons why women did not leave. They were dependent on their partner financially, no one believed them, the criminal justice system ignored their pleas for help and often told women they were responsible.  Women didn’t have control over their lives, they were told they were worthless and over time they started to believe it. They loved their partner and hoped he would change. In response, we wanted to raise consciousness, help women see our own agency, and support each other. We wanted to offer an alternative, for the victims of violence, and for all of us; to change the systems that kept these power differences in place.  Many women stayed with their abusers, and it was just as difficult to watch then as it is disappointing to learn that 53% of white women, and almost half of college education white women voted for Trump.

Much has already been written contrasting how white women voted with the fact that only 4% of black women and 26% of Latinas were Trump supporters. We know that women of color, too, experience violence from within and outside of their families. But women of color – especially Black women – also know what violence has been perpetrated against their communities in order to“protect” white women. So maybe when they looked at Donald Trump, they also saw in him other white men they had known, making his presidency even scarier.

And white women? Is our trade-off to ignore the slights all women face – about our competency and interests, judgements about our bodies, harassment in public spaces, and fear of verbal and physical violations at home or by strangers – so we can be “protected” by white men whose power is enhanced by Trump’s reactionary populism, meaning a political climate that tilts male, white and Christian? Will there be a time when the majority of white women will recognize the costs to them and their mothers, aunts, sisters, daughters and sons of this compromise, and have the courage to bond with their sisters of color, just as so many brave women have taken the risk to leave the “normality” of their abusers?  And will that build a soon-enough, strong-enough movement to stop the madness– the greedy financial interests, male privilege and white supremacy –  that has led us to Donald Trump?

Call for Dissertation Précis now open

Call for Dissertation Précis

 Gender, Place and Culture is committed to promoting scholarship in feminist geography. As part of this commitment the journal is launching a new initiative: publishing doctoral dissertation précis. As part of the feminist geography community, we seek to celebrate academic work written by students who have laboured long and hard to complete their studies. By honoring these accomplishments, the journal can show how students engaging with feminist geography are building the future of the discipline.

 Gender, Place and Culture will be publishing doctoral dissertation précis in each issue. Submissions will be considered on a competitive basis. Each précis will undergo a vetting process by an Editor. Successful submissions will join the queue for publication.

 We seek original pieces of writing of about 1500 words (including references) that summarize a recently defended dissertation. Rather than publishing the abstracts submitted with the dissertation, we request that authors write a different piece summarizing the dissertation in a way that highlights the contributions to feminist geographies. We request that the abstract accompanying the dissertation be submitted alongside the newly written précis. We also request that a set of five to seven key words accompany the submission. Please refer to our guidance notes for further information on dissertation précis at: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=cgpc20&page=instructions

The Editors invite authors to submit précis of their dissertations through ScholarOne. Dissertations defended in 2016 and 2017 are now being accepted.

On behalf of the Editors of Gender, Place and Culture

Pamela Moss

Call for blog post contributions: Help us celebrate 25 years of Gender, Place and Culture!

In 2018, Gender, Place and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography is celebrating its 25th anniversary, and we’d like to mark the occasion by hearing from those of you who have an interest in all things feminist geography! We are therefore looking for expressions of interest to contribute blog posts to our website!

We seek 25 blogs for 25 years. The posts will be released approximately twice a month throughout 2018. And, if we receive more than 25 blogs, we’ll post them more frequently! As well as being shared via our Facebook and Twitter feed (please share with anyone who you think might be interested!) using our special #GPC25 hashtag, the blogs will also be featured on this site and a new GPC@25 website that is currently under construction.

What we need now

All we need at this stage is: 1) title/subject and 2) a short statement of a sentence or two outlining the broad topic. We will decide on the release date of the blogs nearer the time. So at this stage you are only committing yourself to delivering a 750-word blog/essay in principle.

What should I write about?

You may already have a great idea but as a guide, the theme is “Feminist Geographies at 25”. Blogs might reflect on the following ideas, but do not need to be limited to them:

  • Key interventions made by feminist geographers;
  • Histories of feminist geography;
  • Doing feminist geographies;
  • Key themes or issues;
  • Feminist geographers that have inspired your work;
  • Impact of the journal in your work;
  • Calls to action;
  • Why you wanted to be published in Gender, Place and Culture; and

Comments on current events are also appropriate, especially when related to aspects of feminist geography.

Who can write for the site?

We welcome submissions from geographers of all career stages – researchers, scholars, master’s and doctoral students, post-docs, undergraduate students, and community activists. We would especially like to encourage doctoral students and early career researchers to contribute.

Where do I submit my idea and my blog?

Submission ideas should be sent to our dedicated GPC@25 website email address (GPCat25 @ gmail.com) by 31st August 2017. These will ideally be posted in the first half of 2018. A second submission date will be set later. Blog ideas will be vetted and selected that reflect the broad interests of feminist geographers. Once your post has been selected, Anna Tarrant the social media coordinator for Gender, Place and Culture, will get in touch with you to provide an approximate timeline for delivering the blog. We would expect that most contributions be sent to us in the space of 2-3 weeks.

If you have any questions, please ask. Ideas do not need to be fully formed at this stage and we are happy to provide further guidance/advice if necessary.

Volume 24, Issue 4 now available, including special section ‘Embodying violence’

Volume 24, Issue 4 is out now! We have four fascinating articles with international focus exploring the gendered politics of empire, female pilgrims, women’s military experiences and ‘wandering intellectuals’. We also have a special section, edited by Jennifer L. Fluri & Amy Piedalue, entitled ‘Embodying Violence: Critical Geographies of Gender, Race, and Culture.’ The volume finishes with three book reviews.

Articles