Call for blog post contributions: Help us celebrate 25 years of Gender, Place and Culture!

In 2018, Gender, Place and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography is celebrating its 25th anniversary, and we’d like to mark the occasion by hearing from those of you who have an interest in all things feminist geography! We are therefore looking for expressions of interest to contribute blog posts to our website!

We seek 25 blogs for 25 years. The posts will be released approximately twice a month throughout 2018. And, if we receive more than 25 blogs, we’ll post them more frequently! As well as being shared via our Facebook and Twitter feed (please share with anyone who you think might be interested!) using our special #GPC25 hashtag, the blogs will also be featured on this site and a new GPC@25 website that is currently under construction.

What we need now

All we need at this stage is: 1) title/subject and 2) a short statement of a sentence or two outlining the broad topic. We will decide on the release date of the blogs nearer the time. So at this stage you are only committing yourself to delivering a 750-word blog/essay in principle.

What should I write about?

You may already have a great idea but as a guide, the theme is “Feminist Geographies at 25”. Blogs might reflect on the following ideas, but do not need to be limited to them:

  • Key interventions made by feminist geographers;
  • Histories of feminist geography;
  • Doing feminist geographies;
  • Key themes or issues;
  • Feminist geographers that have inspired your work;
  • Impact of the journal in your work;
  • Calls to action;
  • Why you wanted to be published in Gender, Place and Culture; and

Comments on current events are also appropriate, especially when related to aspects of feminist geography.

Who can write for the site?

We welcome submissions from geographers of all career stages – researchers, scholars, master’s and doctoral students, post-docs, undergraduate students, and community activists. We would especially like to encourage doctoral students and early career researchers to contribute.

Where do I submit my idea and my blog?

Submission ideas should be sent to our dedicated GPC@25 website email address (GPCat25 @ gmail.com) by 31st August 2017. These will ideally be posted in the first half of 2018. A second submission date will be set later. Blog ideas will be vetted and selected that reflect the broad interests of feminist geographers. Once your post has been selected, Anna Tarrant the social media coordinator for Gender, Place and Culture, will get in touch with you to provide an approximate timeline for delivering the blog. We would expect that most contributions be sent to us in the space of 2-3 weeks.

If you have any questions, please ask. Ideas do not need to be fully formed at this stage and we are happy to provide further guidance/advice if necessary.

Volume 24, Issue 4 now available, including special section ‘Embodying violence’

Volume 24, Issue 4 is out now! We have four fascinating articles with international focus exploring the gendered politics of empire, female pilgrims, women’s military experiences and ‘wandering intellectuals’. We also have a special section, edited by Jennifer L. Fluri & Amy Piedalue, entitled ‘Embodying Violence: Critical Geographies of Gender, Race, and Culture.’ The volume finishes with three book reviews.

Articles

Recipients of the 2017 Award for New and Emerging Scholars

The Editors for Gender, Place and Culture are very pleased to announce the recipients of the 2017 Annual Award for New and Emerging Scholars.

Kelsey Hanrahan, Towson University
Beth Wangari Kamunge, University of Sheffield

Dr. Kelsey Hanrahan will be presenting her work at the Emotional Geographies Conference in Long Beach, California, in June of this year. Her paper, entitled “The work of love when you can no longer work: Older women’s emotional experiences of dependency in northern Ghana,” is based on her dissertation work completed in 2015.

Beth Wangari Kamunge will be presenting her work at the Royal Society of Geographers with the IBG in London, United Kingdome, in August of this year. Her paper, entitled “The kitchen as a safe feminist space for marginalized knowledges?”, is part of her ongoing research for her doctoral dissertation.

We would encourage those who are attending these conferences to attend these presentations and celebrate their accomplishments together.

Rapid Response call: Emergent Spaces in the Women’s March: Intersectionality and Inclusion

Feminist Geographers Speak Out!

We are seeking papers that talk about the generative spaces brought forward by the Women’s March. These spaces are to bring out the positive aspects of solidarity that lie alongside the restrictive aspects of the US state administration. We are interested in the experiences of feminist geographers as they make sense of the growing reactions to the people who are popularly taking up space in the discussions about policy. We see the Women’s March as the embodiment of the voices that need to be heard. We are interested in inclusion – voices, bodies, viewpoints – and intersectionality – identity, relationships, spatialities.

What has the Women’s March unleashed? What resistance is happening? What are the possibilities? We have received inquiries about these emergent spaces on campuses, in parks, on the streets, in classrooms, and as a globalizing phenomenon. We have also been part of email exchanges, Skype calls, and meetings over coffee about how to support colleagues that are targeted in exclusionary state practices. Discussions about the Boston meeting at the AAG have forced us to think about the politics of boycotts, what supportive spaces mean, and what a feminist politics looks like. Include a project in your course for students to write what they are going and how they are inspired. These spaces are where things are happening, and we invite you to write about them.

These are the discussions we want to see in print. We want to pull together our thinking and not loses these thoughts as we continue our daily lives in parallel struggles. Any lengths – short blogs, and pieces that are singularly focused (1500-3000 words) and those of you who have been writing up analyses for some time, we want to hear from you, too (5000-9000 words). Some pieces we’ll send for review – and others we’ll post on our website https://genderplaceandculture.wordpress.com. Images, poems, videos – we welcome all forms of expression!

Speak out! Speak up! Let us hear from you.

Deadline: March 15 – with publication planned for April/May 2017

Please direct queries and submissions to Pamela Moss pamelam@uvic.ca  or Avril Maddrell avril.maddrell@reading.ac.uk

Women’s March Reference

Women’s March, 2017. Guiding Vision and Definition or Principles. [flyer] Available at:https://genderplaceandculture.files.wordpress.com/2017/02/1391c-wmwguidingvision26definitionofprinciples.pdf [Last accessed 28 January 2017]

 

Call for Rapid Responses: Emergent Spaces in the Women’s March: Intersectionality and Inclusion

The Women’s March brought together hundreds of thousands of supporters in Washington, DC, not only to protest the recent election in the US, but also to “affirm our shared humanity and pronounce our bold message of resistance and self-determination” (Women’s March on Washington, 2017). Conceived initially in November 2016 as a protest against the President-elect, the March took hold and spread across the globe. The day after the inauguration of the new US president, an estimated 4.8 million supporters marched and protested across the world. Participation was well beyond the boundaries of people who consider themselves activists. Sustaining the momentum of the movement is key in keeping these spaces open for resistance.

We seek to map out the emergent spaces, issues and strategies that the Women’s March has opened up for both those in the US under the current administration and those around the world facing similar ultra-conservative, ethnocentric, and nationalist upswellings.

Editors of Gender, Place and Culture welcome submissions that address the Women’s March. We encourage celebratory pieces of works as well as critiques. We thus invite submissions that take the form of creative writing, poetry, image essays, research agendas, strategy documents, policy analysis, viewpoints, polemics, and regular research papers. We call for shorter pieces (1500 to 3000 words) and longer analyses (5000 to 9000 words). We also request blogs, vlogs, and picture essays that once vetted will posted on https://genderplaceandculture.wordpress.com, as they become available.

Deadline – 15 March. Send queries and submissions to:

Pamela Moss pamelam@uvic.ca or Avril Maddrell avril.maddrell@reading.ac.uk

Submissions will be reviewed by the Editors, and where appropriate sent for peer review, with a planned publication of April-May 2017.

Works Cited

Women’s March, 2017. Guiding Vision and Definition or Principles. [flyer] Available at: https://genderplaceandculture.files.wordpress.com/2017/02/1391c-wmwguidingvision26definitionofprinciples.pdf [Last accessed 28 January 2017]

Gender, Place and Culture Welcomes New Managing Editor: Dr. Pamela Moss

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Happy new year to all our readers! Today’s post comes from our new Managing Editor, Dr. Pamela Moss. We are very pleased to share her blog entry as we head into 2017.

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As of the beginning of this year, I assumed the role of Managing Editor at Gender, Place and Culture (GPC). I’m taking over from Peter Hopkins who was in the position for three years. We follow in the footsteps of wonderful feminist scholars who have volunteered their time over the years to promote feminist scholarship in geography and build a legacy for feminist geography within the discipline.

I come to the role with some experience as a GPC Editor. As part of my transition back into geography, after having been away for a number of years in interdisciplinary studies, I applied for, and enthusiastically accepted, the role of Editor at GPC. It is hard to believe that it has already been three and a half years! I have learned a great deal working with GPC colleagues. I must thank Robyn Longhurst, Peter Hopkins, Lynda Johnston and Avril Maddrell for welcoming me into the position. Much of my hands-on training came from Jenny Lloyd and Carl Thompson who held the crucial position of Editorial Assistant to the Managing Editor. Maral Sotoudehnia has now taken over from Carl, and she tirelessly continues my training in a supportive manner. I’m getting to know the rest of the editorial team – Kanchana Ruwanpura and Katherine Brickell as Editors, Marcia England and Nathaniel Lewis as Book Review Editors, and Anna Tarrant and Lisa Dam as Social Media Editors.

There is obviously much excellent feminist geography work going on for since my time at GPC, the journal has doubled in size – from 6 to 12 issues per year! As editors, we have tried to figure out effective ways to get this work published. Most recently, the journal has introduced three new publishing formats for GPC: Interventions, Book Review Essays, and Multimedia Contributions. General Descriptions of each can be found here. Interventions are similar to Themed Sections, but the contributions are shorter and organized around one problematic. Book Review Essays can either be an author reviewing more than one book or a group of authors engaging with one book. Multimedia Contributions are accompanied by a short essay explaining the contribution the piece of media makes to feminist geography (see an example here at the bottom of the page).

Even with these changes, the journal will continue to be organized around what I see as its central, most basic value – generating a supportive and intellectually engaged environment for publishing feminist work in geography. Editors seek out leading scholars to provide critical readings of manuscripts. These scholars deliver informed and detailed reviews that assist authors in developing and enhancing the scholarship manifest in the submissions. The feedback, offered in the generous spirit of intellectual expansion (although when you first get reviews as an author, this isn’t necessarily the first thing that jumps in your mind!), gives the authors some direction during the revisions. Editors support authors through the process, especially those going through the process for the first time or are early on in their careers.

I am looking forward to managing the journal. I see my role as one that facilitates the gathering and distribution of feminist scholarship in geography. If you ever have a question about the journal, the review process, or aspirations for publishing, please contact me. I am happy to be part of a conversation.

Let me close with an invitation. On behalf of the entire editorial group, I invite you to submit your work to GPC. For you – all of you – are key in continuing the strong tradition that has made GPC what it is today.

Annual Award for New and Emerging Scholars, 2017

Application closing date: 27 January 2017

The editorial team of Gender, Place and Culture is pleased to announce an annual award valued at a maximum of US$1,500 for new and emerging scholars. The award is targeted at emerging researchers in feminist geographies who are trying to establish research careers and create research momentum. The purpose is to support the research programme of promising feminist geographers and to give an impetus to their careers. The applicant should be involved in independent research and not be merely part of a larger group’s research project. Priority for this award will be given to current graduate students or faculty members within three years of receiving their PhD who are situated in partially or poorly funded positions, who work in departments where little or no money is available for conference participation and who have no recourse to grants from funding agencies such as the Economic and Social Research Council in the UK and the National Science Foundation in the USA or equivalent (if you currently hold one of these grants or have just completed one you will not be considered eligible for this award). 

This award is intended to be used for attendance at an international conference of your choice, at which you will present a paper on a topic relating to feminist geography. The successful applicant is expected to use the award within one year of its receipt.

Applicants are asked to submit the following:

  • an abstract of the conference paper (250-300 words) and conference information including, if possible, confirmation of acceptance of your paper;
  • your CV;
  • a paragraph outlining how your research contributes to feminist geography;
  • a proposed budget (for accommodation, travel, conference fees, per diem, etc.);
  • and a cover letter including your contact details (mailing address, email, and telephone number).

Please send your applications to the Managing Editor, Pamela Moss (pamelam@uvic.ca), by 27 January 2017. A decision on the award will be made within 4 to 6 weeks of this deadline. Within one month of attending the conference, the successful applicant is expected to submit receipts as well as a one page report.

Editor’s Choice Collection: access selected articles for free until March 2017

The Managing Editor and the Editors of Gender, Place and Culture have just made thirteen articles in the journal free of access until March 2017, in recognition of the fine scholarship that has come to be part of the journal.  Covering a diverse range of topics these articles showcase some of the best and cutting-edge research that is shaping contemporary feminist geography.

You can view their choices and links to the articles here. Congratulations to the researchers whose papers have been selected.

If you are interested in publishing in the journal, we continue to seek articles based on primary research that addresses one or more of the following:

  • the particularities and intersections of gender, race, ethnicity, age, (dis)ability, sexuality, class, culture and place;
  • feminist, anti-racist, critical and radical geographies of space, place, nature and the environment;
  • feminist geographies of difference, resistance, marginality and/or spatial negotiation;
  • and critical methodology.

Editors: Peter Hopkins, Avril Maddrell, Pamela Moss and Kanchana Ruwanpura

Our ‘Feminists on the Frontlines’ podcasts are now online

Our ‘Feminists on the Frontlines’ podcasts, including transcripts, are now available online at the Gender, Place and Culture Homepage.

‘Feminists on the Frontlines’ comprise two panels of leading feminist researchers that provide a behind-the-scenes glimpse at part of the history and present-day experiences of feminist organizing in the discipline of geography.

Part One, “Lessons from the Past,” is a collection of reflections on personal experiences by scholars who helped establish feminist geography within the discipline. The panel of discussants includes Cindi Katz, Audrey Kobayashi, Linda Peake, Pamela Moss, Valerie Preston, and Sue Ruddick.

Part Two, “Forging the Future,” begins where the first ends, and includes reflections on more recent years and contemporary issues. This features Leslie Kern, Ranu Basu, Jennifer Fluri, Beverley Mullings, Tiffany Muller-Myrdahl, Rupal Oza, and Alison Mountz.

Enjoy!

Seeking a New Book Review Editor

Gender, Place and Culture: A Journal of Feminist Geography, published by Taylor & Francis, is a well-established geography journal with an international circulation. The current Managing Editor is Peter Hopkins and Editors are Avril Maddrell, Pamela Moss and Kanchana Ruwanpura. The journal has two Book Review Editors, currently Andrew Gorman-Murray and Nathaniel Lewis. The journal is looking to replace Andrew Gorman-Murray whose term is coming to an end.

This new book review editor will join the journal for a three year term. As Gender, Place and Culture publishes twelve issues per annum, both book review editors will be responsible for providing book reviews for six issues each. The new book review editor will start in January 2017 but will be asked to start shadowing the current book review editors as soon as possible after appointment.

Candidates should:
–    have a broad knowledge of the field of feminist geography and of women’s and gender studies;
–    actively encourage submissions from scholars from all world regions;
–    encourage the review of a wide range of texts;
–    be able to seek texts from publishers;
–    have access to email;
–    have excellent editing skills.

Our preference is for people who already have editorial experience as they will be required to commence the preparation of book reviews fairly soon after joining the journal. Applications should consist of a letter detailing the candidate’s editorial experience, including their vision and ambitions for the journal, plus a CV. Nominations of suitable persons are also being solicited.

The closing date for Applications is 10 October 2016.

Further information about the activities and responsibilities of the book review editor can be obtained from Peter Hopkins. Nominations and applications should be e-mailed to Peter Hopkins at peter.hopkins@ncl.ac.uk.

Details about the journal can be found at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/cgpc20/current.